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Archive for January, 2010

Satellite Image of Machu Picchu – Thousands of Tourists Stranded by Heavy Rains and Mudslides

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

Satellite image of Machu Picchu before the heavy rains and mudslides that plagued the area on January 26, 2010 stranding thousands of tourists and leaving 20 people dead. At least 250 homes and bridges and parts of several highways were severely affected as fast moving water and fallen rock covered the roads.

Machu_Picchu_Peru

IKONOS Satellite Image of Machu Picchu, Peru

Copyright © 2010 GeoEye. All Rights Reserved.

Helicopters were being sent to the scene to evacuate some 2,000 people. Tourists were trapped at the World Heritage site in the eastern Peruvian jungle, while two others were killed in separate mudslides. Other deaths were reported over the weekend and another person died when a hillside collapsed due to a landslide.

Watch Video of Floods

Remote Sensing for Mudslides and Flooding Disasters

Remote sensing techniques greatly aid in the investigations of mudslides (also known as mudflows) and landslides, on both a local and regional scale. Remote sensing offers an additional tool from which we can extract information about mudflow and landslide causes and occurrences. Most importantly, they greatly aid in the prediction of future occurrences, which is very important to those who reside in areas surrounded by unstable slopes.

Mudflows and landslides in around the world pose threats to settlements and structures, often result in catastrophic damage to highways, railways, waterways, and pipelines.

To determine where protective measures are necessary, scientists and technicians produce landslide inventory and risk assessment maps for many areas around the world. Mudflows and landslides unfortunately, do not display a clear relationship between magnitude and frequency as do earthquakes and floods. Landslide studies are challenging to scientists, due to the difficulty to represent landslide hazards in quantitative terms over large areas.

Analysis and Prediction of Landslides in GIS (Geographic Information Systems)

machu-picchu

Machu Picchu, Peru

Machu Picchu is one of the most popular destinations in Peru as it welcomes 400,000 visitors per year. Voted as one of the “Seven Wonders in the World”  in 2007, is one of the most famous Incan cities in the world. Sun alignments are found throughout Machu Picchu, many features, including the Sacred Plaza, The Temple of Three Windows and The Intihuatana platform, align with the summer solstice azimuth of 65-245 degrees. Scientists believe these alignments were primary considerations in the construction of the shrines. A shaft of light, shining through an east-facing window, reportedly illuminates The Torreon, or Temple of the Sun, during the summer solstice. The city was built between 1460 and 1470 AD at an altitude of 8,000 feet. Satellite Image: Copyright © 2008 GeoEye. All Rights Reserved.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including engineering and construction, homeland security, defense, intelligence and disaster response using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Images of Devastating Earthquake in Haiti

Monday, January 18th, 2010

GeoEye-1 satellite sensor captured a high resolution satellite image of the most devastating earthquake of the century that hit Port-au-Prince, Haiti on Tuesday January 12th. The quake killing around 170,000 people possibly more and leaving one million homeless, without  food or water as a result of a 7.0-magnitude earthquake.

Destruction to buildings, hospitals and roads left Haitians with a shortage on medical supplies and doctors for the injured and no equipment to move the rubble and debris. With many dead and not knowing what to do, people are having to pile bodies in the streets and leaving many with no relief or hope.

satellite image haiti earthquake port au prince geoeye-1

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image – Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Post Earthquake – January 13, 2010

GeoEye-1 satellite image above was taken from 423 miles in space at 10:27 am EST on Jan. 13, 2010 as it moved from north to south over the Caribbean at a speed of four miles per second. Ground resolution is half meter (19 inches).

To view a YouTube video of more Before and After satellite images go here.

The 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck shortly before 5 p.m. Tuesday, centered about 10 miles (15 kilometers) southwest of Port-au-Prince, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. It could be felt strongly in eastern Cuba, more than 200 miles away due to the earthquake being shallow meaning that the energy that was released is very close to the surface. The earthquake’s power matched that of several nuclear bombs and about 3 million people were affected by the quake.

Haiti sits on a large fault that has caused catastrophic quakes in the past, but this one was described as among the most powerful to hit the region.

satellite image Presidents palace 2008 haiti port au prince

IKONOS (0.8 m) Satellite Image – President’s Palace (2008)

Before earthquake – Port-au-Prince, Haiti

satellite image presidents palace 2010 haiti port au prince

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image – President’s Palace (2010)

After earthquake – Port-au-Prince, Haiti

satellite image Haiti port au prince before earthquake

IKONOS (0.8 m) Satellite Image – (2008)

Before earthquake – Port-au-Prince, Haiti

satelliet image Haiti port au prince after earthquake january 2010

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image – (2010)

After earthquake – Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Damage and Recovery Assessments

The above satellite images show before and after the earthquake causing widespread destruction to communities, buildings and roads. Satellite imagery is used to get ground and air assessments of the damage to help rescue and relief workers to focus on their efforts to respond to emergencies and natural hazards.

Satellite images and aerial photography greatly aids rescue efforts  for emergency personnel to access damage from earthquakes and allowing state and government agencies the ability to view the damage from multiple vantage points. The spatial resolution of an image determines the ability to view individual features such as buildings and bridges. It also affects the ability to monitor and assess damage conditions. Resolution of approximately 10 meters or smaller are necessary to discern the presence and location of individual buildings, while high resolution imagery of one meter or less can distinguish damage conditions of individual buildings, roads and structures.

What Caused the Earthquake

Topography Along the Enriquillo-Plaintain Garden Fault, Haiti

More Photos

Mass Graves in Haiti

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including engineering and construction, homeland security, defense, intelligence and disaster response using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Image of Mount Nyamulagira Volcano in Virunga National Parks

Saturday, January 16th, 2010

Satellite image view of Mount Nyamulagira volcano that erupted earlier this month in Eastern Congo threatening villagers and Virunga National Park, home to rare chimpanzees and critically endangered mountain gorillas.

Virunga National Parks nyamulagira volcano

Landsat 7 Satellite Image of Virunga National Parks

Mount Nyamulagira

Nyamulagira (also known as Nyamuragira) is one of Africa’s most active volcanoes, if not the most active that last erupted in 2006. About 25 kilometers north of Lake Kivu, and located to the northwest of Nyiragongo Volcano, it contrasts with its tall, steep-sided neighbor. Nyamulagira is relatively short. It is a shield volcano with gentle slopes. Shield volcanoes derive their name from their resemblance to metal shields warriors once used. Major eruptions at Nyamulagira have occurred recently enough to change the volcano caldera’s structure since the early 20th century.

More on Virunga National Parks including Satellite Images

To view Thermal Maps of Volcano eruption go here

Watch Video of Eruption

Latest News (January 25, 2010) on Nyamulagira

Virunga National Park contains within 790,000 hectares the greatest diversity of habitats of any park in Africa, from steppes, savannas and lava plains, swamps, lowland and forests to volcanoes. Thousands of hippopotamuses and elephants live in the park’s rivers and its mountains are a critical area for the survival of the mountain and lowland gorillas.

3D Flythrough Movie – Visoke Volcano

3d fly through virunga national parks visoke volcano

1m Stereo IKONOS Satellite Image Data and 5m DTM

The Virunga National Park lies from the Virunga Mountains to the Rwenzori Mountains in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo which borders the Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda and Rwenzori Mountains National Park in Uganda. Covering 7,800 Km2 it was established in 1925 as Africa’s first national park and classified as a World Heritage Site in 1979. It has become well known for its, poaching and civil wars in the region that have seriously damaged its wildlife population.

Remote Sensing for Natural Disasters

Satellite imagery and aerial photography incorporated with geographic information systems (GIS), can give researchers and emergency officials a wealth of information for assessment, analysis and monitoring of natural disasters such as volcano damage from small to large regions around the globe.

Volcanic studies can be organized into three phases:

1. Detection and classification

2. Monitoring activity of existing volcanoes

3. Analysis of eruption in spatial distribution and temporal distribution

Remote Sensing gives state and government agencies the ability to view the damage from multiple vantage points. The spatial resolution of an image determines the ability to view individual features such as morphological features, suitable for eruption warning and for detecting plumes and lava flows. It also affects the ability to monitor and assess damage conditions, and depends on the nature of the hazard itself.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including engineering and construction, homeland security, defense, intelligence and disaster response using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com