Satellite Imaging Corp.

Archive for the ‘Defense & Intelligence’ Category

Pleiades-1B Satellite Successfully Launched

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

Pleiades-1B satellite was successfully launched on December 2, 2012 built by Astrium was launched off aboard a Soyuz launcher from the European Space Centre in French Guiana.

Pleiades-1B is the second dual-use, very-high-resolution satellite for the Pleiades constellation.

The launch of Pleiades-1B marks the third step in the formation of a constellation of four satellites combining a double daily revisit capability and an ingenious range of resolutions.

Pleiades-1B Satellite Sensor

Image Credit: ASTRIUM

Pleiades-1B Satellite Launch

Pleiades-1 (also known as Pleiades-1A) and 1B satellites will be phased 180° apart in the same near-polar sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 694 km, enabling daily revisits to any location on the planet which makes it ideal for mapping large scale areas including engineering construction projects, monitoring of mining, industrial and military complexes, conflict zones and crisis/disaster areas, natural disasters, evacuation and rescue operations.

Pleiades-1 and Pleiades-1B will deliver 0.5m imagery products, and SPOT-6 and SPOT 7, designed to assure continuity of service after SPOT-5 (2.5/5m) to supply high-resolution data products at 1.5m resolution. SPOT-6 was launched on September 9, 2012.

In addition to their high precision, the Pleiades satellites are also notable for their remarkable agility, which enables tilted imaging from nadir and operation in several acquisition modes (20 images over 1000 x 1000 km², stereo, 3D, mosaic, corridor, etc.). For more technical information on the Pleaides-1B satellite, please visit here.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified imaging mosaics, DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications using high, medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information, please contact us.

Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Pleiades-1A Satellite Captures First Panchromatic Images

Monday, January 9th, 2012

Pleiades-1 (0.5m) satellite sensor captured the first panchromatic satellite images after its successful launch from Kourou launch site (French Guiana) via a Russian Soyuz ST rocket on December 16, 2011. The launch marked a new step in French-Russian cooperation: it is the second time when the Russian launch vehicle “Soyuz-ST” took off from the French site. The Pléiades system was designed under the French-Italian ORFEO program (Optical & Radar Federated Earth Observation) between 2001 and 2003.

Pleiades-1 will represent the first very high-resolution satellite from SPOT and will be capable of providing orthorectified color data at 0.5-meter resolution (roughly comparable to GeoEye-1) and revisiting any point on Earth as it covers a total of 1 million square kilometers (approximately 386,102 square miles) daily. Perhaps most importantly, Pleiades-1 will be capable of acquiring high-resolution stereo imagery in just one pass, and can accommodate large areas (up to 1,000 km x 1,000 km).

satellite image pleaides 1 Casablanca Mosquee

Pleaides-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image of Casablanca Mosque

To view in high resolution click image.

(Image credit: CNES)

pleiasdes-1 satellite photo SanFrancisco Airport

Pleaides-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image of San Francisco Airport

To view in high resolution click image.

(Image credit: CNES)

To view more Pleiades-1 Satellite Images, visit here.

The Pléiades constellation is composed of two very-high-resolution optical Earth-imaging satellites. Pléiades-1 and Pléiades-2 will provide coverage of Earth’s surface with a repeat cycle of 26 days. Their great agility enables a daily access all over the world, which is a critical need for defense and civil security applications, and a coverage capacity necessary for the cartography kind of applications at scales better than those accessible to SPOT family satellites. Moreover, Pleiades have stereoscopic acquisition capacity to meet the fine cartography needs, notably in urban regions. Pléiades-2 will launch in mid-2012.

Pleiades-1 Satellite SensorPleaides-1 Satellite Sensor

(Image credit: Astrium/CNES)

The satellite will feature four spectral bands (blue, green, red, and IR), as well as image location accuracy of 4.5m (CE90) without ground control points, a wide swath of a scene (20 km, whereas the best US remote sensing satellites have 11-16 km of swath width). Image location accuracy can be improved even further — up to an exceptional 1 meter — by the use of GCPs. Because the satellite has been designed with urgent tasking in mind, images can be requested from Pleiades-1 less then six hours before they are acquired. This functionality will prove invaluable in situations where the expedited collection of new image data is crucial, such as crisis monitoring.

Furthermore, Pleiades constellation offers new services delivering precise geospatial information in record time and capabilities that marks a  shift in the Earth imaging sector. With 450 images acquired every day by each satellite, five acquisition scenarios, and three daily tasking plans, the Pleiades system is tailored to meet the needs of real-time applications.

To view specifications on the Pleiades-1, visit here.

To watch a video of the Pleiades-1 satellite launch, visit here.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company, provides global satellite imaging and processing services for a number of industries, including oil and gas, mining, cadastre, tax mapping, construction, environmental, forestry and agriculture.

The company specializes in high and medium resolution satellite imaging products and technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS and CAD applications including, environmental studies, culture extraction, exploration for natural resources, engineering/construction utilizing high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data and specialized Image processing techniques.

Satellite Imaging Corporation
36842 Meadow Creek Court
Magnolia, Texas 77355-8603
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900 Ext.: 202
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

IKONOS Satellite Sensor Celebrates Its 11th Year In Orbit

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

IKONOS the world’s first commercial high-resolution Earth observing Satellite celebrates its 11th year in orbit. The IKONOS Satellite sensor was designed and built by Lockheed Martin and is operated by GeoEye.

IKONOS was launched on September 24, 1999 with a 0.82 meter resolution capable of capturing a 3.28m multispectral, Near-Infrared (NIR) at nadir. Its applications include environmental monitoring, government, homeland security, tax mapping, mining, land management, disaster relief and other geospatial applications. The spacecraft continues to collect black-and-white imagery while simultaneously collecting multispectral data for more than four years beyond its initial design life.

To view high resolution satellite images from the IKONOS satellite visit here.

ikonos satellite sensor earth observing

IKONOS Satellite Sensor (Image courtesy: GeoEye)

IKONOS Stereo Satellite Imagery

The IKONOS Satellite sensor can be programmed to acquire Stereo Imagery for the production of Digital Surface Models (DSM’s) or Digital Elevation Models (DEM’s) with postings of 2m – 3m. From the Stereo pair the near Nadir scene will be utilized to produce <1m Natural Color Satellite Image mosaic.

Other Sensors Operated by GeoEye

GeoEye-1

GeoEye-1 launched on September 6, 2008 is capable of acquiring image data at 0.41 meter panchromatic (B&W) and 1.64 meter multispectral resolution. It also features a revisit time of less than three days, as well as the ability to locate an object within just three meters of its physical location.

This sensor is optimized for large projects, as it can collect over 350,000 square kilometers of pan-sharpened multispectral Satellite imagery every day.

geoeye-1 satellite sensor earth observing

GeoEye-1 Satellite Sensor (Image courtesy: GeoEye)

GeoEye-2

Lockheed Martin Space Systems is progressing steadily under a contract to design, build, and launch GeoEye’s next-generation, commercial Earth-imaging satellite, known as GeoEye-2. GeoEye-2 will be launched aboard an Atlas V rocket provided by Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services and will be operational in early 2013.

The GeoEye-2 Satellite sensor will benefit from significant improvements in capability, including enhanced direct tasking, and the potential to collect imagery of the Earth’s surface at 0.25-meter or 9.75-inch ground resolution.

GeoEye-2 satellite sensor earth observing

GeoEye-2 Satellite Sensor (Image courtesy: GeoEye)

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
36842 Meadow Creek Court
Magnolia, Texas  77355-8603
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Images Capture Construction of Iran’s Hidden Nuclear Site Near Qom

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

The GeoEye-1 satellite sensor captured Iran’s hidden nuclear site under construction near Qom in September of 2009. Hidden in the hills, construction was started at the uranium enrichment site during 2006. The complex is on a military base controlled by Iran, making access difficult. But through information from satellite imagery, Iranian dissidents and other human intelligence, a sufficiently detailed picture was built up to convince investigators that Iran was preparing to make nuclear fuel there.

satellite image Iran nuclear site Qom

The IKONOS satellite sensor collected this 0.8m Satellite Image on February 5, 2000 showing pre-construction and imagery from the GeoEye-1 satellite (below) shows present construction. GeoEye-1 image taken on September 26, 2009 from 423 miles in space as Virginia based GeoEye’s newest satellite, GeoEye-1, moved from north to south over the Middle East at a speed of 7.5 km per second.

satellite image nuclear site Qom_iran

satellite image Qom_iran hidden nuclear facility

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image Detailed View of Uranium Enrichment Site – Qom, Iran

To view a video of zoomed in high resolution details of site go here

According to IHS Janes, who did the analysis of the imagery, the imagery shows a well fortified facility with a main entrance, which was seen under construction early this year, and is now a building that abuts and provides access into the mountain. Small round ventilation shafts in the center of the mountain are near completion. Quarry equipment, a surface-to-air missile site, and more construction equipment surround the mountain. This facility is still under construction.

The small-scale site discovered near Qom is meant to house no more than 3,000 centrifuges. The enriching machines in Qom facility will produce nuclear fuel, which could possibly be further enriched into material for atomic warheads.

The global standoff over Iran’s nuclear program began in 2002 with the discovery of two large nuclear facilities in Natanz and Arak. Tehran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes to generate electricity. Iran says it has built the facility inside a mountain next to a military site to protect its nuclear activities in case of an attack by the US or Israel.

Iran’s Existing Nuclear Sites

Arak – Heavy Water Plant

A 40 MWt heavy water moderated research reactor which should be ready for commissioning in 2014.

Natanz – Uranium Enrichment Plant

This once secret site was one of the two exposed by Alireza Jafarzadeh in August, 2002. Under the terms of Iran’s safeguards agreement, Iran was under no obligation to report the existence of the site while it was still under construction. There are currently approximately 7,000 centrifuges installed at Natanz, of which 5,000 are producing low enriched uranium.

Isfahan- Uranium Conversion Plant

A nuclear research facility that currently operates four small nuclear research reactors, all supplied by China.  The Uranium Conversion Facility at Isfahan converts yellowcake into uranium hexafluoride. As of late October 2004, the site is 70% operational with 21 of 24 workshops completed. There is also a Zirconium Production Plant (ZPP) located nearby that produces the necessary ingredients and alloys for nuclear reactors.

Bushehr – Nuclear Power Station

Construction was completed in March 2009. The plant is planned to begin production by August 22, 2009 and would be brought up to full capacity by the end of March 2010.

Watch video of  New York Post – Iran: The Nuclear Question

Latest News Update (November 17, 2009) – Russia delays Iranian reactor, Turkey awaits response on uranium storage

News Update (November 27, 2009) – Iran rebuked over nuclear ‘cover-up’ by UN watchdog

Governments and private enterprises throughout the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, are quickly learning the value of Remote Sensing and GIS in maximizing security programs. This type of information can enable local governments to better assess and understand how to develop programs to save lives, protect property and enhance the future economic stability of their communities. The current threats to a country range from incidents of terrorism and information attacks on critical infrastructure to the potential use of weapons of mass destruction. Each one of these threats could cause massive casualties and disruption to a country.

By combining satellite imagery and terrain elevation databases from high resolution satellite images from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2, Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS and SPOT-5 realistic and true-color 3D terrain visualizations can be created of any location on Earth for flight training, battlefield management, mission rehearsal, research, and other activities which provide vital information for aerial mission planners and command information systems. To view a 3d Fly Through flight simulations of another nuclear site go here.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including engineering and construction, homeland security, defense, intelligence and disaster response using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

WorldView-2 Captures First High Resolution Full Color Satellite Images!

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

WorldView-2 satellite captured its first pan-sharpened, multispectral images at (0.46 meter resolution) from almost 500 miles above the Earth. These images supply unprecedented detail and geospatial accuracy, further expanding the applications for satellite imagery in both commercial and government markets. Added spectral diversity provides the ability to perform precise change detection and mapping.

WorldView-2 Dallas Texas Love Airfield Satellite Image

WorldView-2 Satellite Image (0.5m) of Dallas Love Airfield, Texas USA

WorldView-2 First Image-San Antonio, Texas

WorldView-2 Satellite Image (0.5m) of San Antonio Conference Center, Texas USA

WorldView-2 sensor provides a high resolution Panchromatic band and eight (8) Multispectral bands; four (4) standard colors (red, green, blue, and near-infrared 1) and four (4) new bands (coastal, yellow, red edge, and near-infrared 2), full-color images for enhanced spectral analysis, mapping and monitoring applications, land-use planning, disaster relief, exploration, defense and intelligence, visualization and simulation environments.

worldview_2_spectral_bands

DigitalGlobe’s WorldView-2 was launched successfully on October 8, 2009 11:52 am at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, U.S.A. With its improved agility, WorldView-2 is able to act like a paintbrush, sweeping back and forth to collect very large areas of multispectral imagery in a single pass. WorldView-2 alone is able to collect nearly 1 million km2 every day, doubling the collection capacity of our constellation to nearly 2 million km2 per day. And the combination of WorldView-2’s increased agility and high altitude enables it to typically revisit any place on earth in 1.1 days. When added to the satellite constellation, revisit time drops below one day and never exceeds two days, providing the most same-day passes of any commercial high resolution constellation.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company, provides global satellite imaging and processing services for a number of industries, including oil and gas, mining, cadastre, tax mapping, construction, environmental, forestry and agriculture.

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including, flight simulations, terrain modeling, engineering and construction using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data such as GeoEye-1, Worldview-1, QuickBird and IKONOS.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: http://www.satimagingcorp.com

Worldview-2 Satellite Launched Successfully!

Thursday, October 8th, 2009

WorldView-2 was launched successfully on October 8, 2009 11:52 am at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, U.S.A. Worldview-2 is the first 8-band multispectral satellite sensor commercially available. Operating at an altitude of 770 kilometers, WorldView-2 will provide half-meter panchromatic resolution and 2.0 meter multispectral resolution for non-US Government customers.

To watch launch go here.

worldview-2 satellite

Image Credit: DigitalGlobe

WorldView-2 will have an average revisit time of a day and will be capable of collecting up to 975,000 square kilometers (376,450 square miles) per day, doubling the DigitalGlobe collection capacity. The WorldView-2 system, offering unsurpassed accuracy, agility, capacity and spectral diversity will provide high resolution satellite imagery of 0.5 meters.

Worldview-2 will provide highly detailed imagery for precise map creation, change detection and in-depth image analysis and will have the ability to perform precise change detection, mapping and analysis at unprecedented resolutions in multispectral imagery.

Worldview-2 imagery will allow the creation of accurate maps in remote areas, maximizing the utility of whatever resources are available.

Frequent revisits increase image collection opportunities, enhance change detection applications and enable accurate map updates.

To view Worldview-2 specifications click here.

DigitalGlobe currently operates the QuickBird satellite launched in October 2001, which can collect panchromatic images with 0.61-meter resolution and multispectral (BGRN) images with 2.44-meter resolution at Nadir. It is expected to operate until 2009. DigitalGlobe further operates the WorldView-1 high-capacity, panchromatic imaging system launched on September 18, 2008 providing Mono and Stereo half-meter resolution imagery to the Geospatial Industry. Operating at an altitude of 496 kilometers, WorldView-1 has an average revisit time of 1.7 days and is capable of collecting up to 750,000 square kilometers (290,000 square miles) per day of halfmeter imagery. The satellite also is equipped with state-of-the-art geo-location accuracy of <2m without GCP’s while with one (1) or two (2) GCP’s the geospatial position accuracy can be improved to <1m and further exhibits stunning agility with rapid targeting and efficient in-track stereo collection.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company, provides global satellite imaging and processing services for a number of industries, including oil and gas, mining, cadastre, tax mapping, construction, environmental, forestry and agriculture.

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including, flight simulations, terrain modeling, engineering and construction using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data such as GeoEye-1, Worldview-1, QuickBird and IKONOS.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: http://www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Images and GIS Aid in Disease Mapping and Surveillance

Wednesday, October 7th, 2009

Satellite images and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can provide public health officials with vital information needed to detect and manage certain disease outbreaks. In order to properly plan, manage and monitor any public health system, it is very important to have up to date, relevant information available to decision-makers at all levels throughout all regions of the world.

H1N1 Swine Flu Mapping

Satellite Imagery and GIS Epidemiology Mapping for Swine Flu

Image Credit FluTracker

Also known as Landscape Epidemiology, which involves the identification of geographical areas where disease is transmitted. By knowing the vegetation and geologic conditions necessary for the maintenance of specific pathogens in nature, one can use the landscape to identify the spatial and temporal distribution of disease risk. Key environmental elements, including elevation, temperature, rainfall, and humidity, influence the presence, development, activity, and longevity of pathogens, vectors, zoonotic reservoirs of infection, and their interactions with humans.

Vegetation type and distribution are also influenced by the environmental variables mentioned above, and can be expressed as landscape elements that can be sensed remotely and whose relationships can be modeled spatially. For the past 29 years, satellite sensors have proved to be valuable tools for describing the earth’s landscape. Since the launch of Landsat 7 and ASTER, NASA has initiated programs to integrate these technologies into the areas of forestry, agriculture, geology,  and public health.

vegetation land cover

Landsat Satellite Image – Vegetation Cover

aster hydrology

ASTER Satellite Image – Hydrology

Satellite images can greatly enhance a GIS mapping project. Imagery is a powerful visual aid and serves as a source of derivative information such as planimetrics and classification schemes to derive such information as land cover and change detection or vegetation classification.

The use of GIS has many implications for landscape epidemiology because it provides users the ability to store, integrate, query, display, and analyze data from the molecular level to that of satellite resolution through their shared spatial components. Field observations and vector data retrieved on environmental conditions, including vegetation, water (hydrology), and topography, can be combined in a GIS mapping environment to direct interpretation of remote sensed data and facilitate characterization of the landscape in terms of vector and pathogen prevalence.

geospatial gis

GIS Epidemiology

Example of GIS Epidemiology for Malaria

Image Credit World Health Organization (WHO)

The associations between disease risk variables (e.g., vector, pathogen, and reservoir host abundance and distribution) and environmental variables can be quantified using the spatial analysis capabilities of the GIS. Landscape pattern analysis, combined with statistical analysis, allows us to define landscape predictors of disease risk that can be applied in larger regions where field data are unavailable. This makes remote sensing and GIS a powerful set of tools for disease surveillance, predicting potential disease outbreaks, and targeting intervention programs.

The analysis and mapping of data using GIS include:

  • The spread of diseases over time
  • Spatial patterns of outbreaks
  • Population groups at risk
  • Availability and access to health care
  • Program intervention planning and assessment

Examples of Interactive Disease Maps

Health Map on Virus Alerts

2009  Swine Flu Outbreak Map

Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation combines orthorectified satellite images and digital aerial photography mosaics with extracted vector and client-supplied attribute data to create single, data-rich images for GIS and other mapping applications to achieve a multi-layered result for many types of analysis.

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS applications including, flight simulations, terrain modeling, engineering and construction using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, Landsat 7 and ASTER.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

WorldView-2 Satellite Scheduled to Launch October 8

Tuesday, September 8th, 2009

Worldview-2 satellite is scheduled to launch October 8, 2009, aboard a Delta II rocket procured from United Launch Alliance (ULA). The launch is scheduled for 11:38 a.m. from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. WorldView-2 is the third satellite Ball Aerospace has built for DigitalGlobe’s constellation of commercial remote sensing satellites. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation successfully completed and passed environmental testing for the Worldview-2 satellite. To watch launch go here.

The WorldView-2 sensor will provide a high resolution Panchromatic (0.46m) band and eight (8) Multispectral bands; four (4) standard colors (red, green, blue, and near-infrared 1) and four (4) new bands (coastal, yellow, red edge, and near-infrared 2), full-color images for enhanced spectral analysis, mapping and monitoring applications, land-use planning, disaster relief, exploration, defense and intelligence, and visualization and simulation environments.

worldview-2

Image Copyright © Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation

WorldView-2 environmental testing included thermal vacuum, electromagnetic compatibility, electromagnetic interference, vibration, shock, and acoustic testing to confirm the design integrity of the spacecraft, according to the company. The Ball Aerospace BCP 5000 spacecraft, utilized for both WorldView-1 and WorldView-2, is designed to handle both next-generation optical and synthetic aperture radar remote sensing payloads and is reportedly meeting or exceeding all performance specifications on the operational WorldView-1 satellite. The high performance BCP 5000 has a design life of more than seven years.

To view Worldview-2 Technical Data click here.

DigitalGlobe currently operates the QuickBird satellite launched in October 2001, which can collect panchromatic images with 0.61-meter resolution and multispectral (BGRN) images with 2.44-meter resolution at Nadir. It is expected to operate until 2009. DigitalGlobe further operates the WorldView-1 high-capacity, panchromatic imaging system launched on September 18, 2008 providing Mono and Stereo half-meter resolution imagery (0.46- meter) to the Geospatial Industry. Operating at an altitude of 496 kilometers, WorldView-1 has an average revisit time of 1.7 days and is capable of collecting up to 750,000 square kilometers (290,000 square miles) per day of halfmeter imagery. The satellite also is equipped with state-of-the-art geo-location accuracy of <2m without GCP’s while with one (1) or two (2) GCP’s the geospatial position accuracy can be improved to <1m and further exhibits stunning agility with rapid targeting and efficient in-track stereo collection.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company, provides global satellite imaging and processing services for a number of industries, including oil and gas, mining, cadastre, tax mapping, construction, environmental, forestry and agriculture.

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including, flight simulations, terrain modeling, engineering and construction using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data such as GeoEye-1, Worldview-1, QuickBird and IKONOS.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: http://www.satimagingcorp.com

Aerial Overview of Tehran, Iran during Election Protests

Friday, June 26th, 2009

Satellite Imaging Corporation has published an aerial overview of Tehran, Iran, the country’s capital and site of numerous recent election protests. The 1-meter resolution satellite image, which depicts notable landmarks such as Lalen Park and Vali Asr Square, was acquired by the IKONOS satellite sensor on June 18, 2009.

Eye on Iran

Shortly following the conclusion of the 2009 Iranian presidential election, supporters of reformist Iranian presidential candidate Mir-Hossein Mousavi defiantly took their message to the streets and the Internet. They quickly summoned the attention of the international community with allegations that the election results were a product of electoral fraud.

The government of Iran, seemingly uninfluenced by a growing unrest, officially upheld the contested victory of hardline incumbent candidate Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. In order to quell the uprising, they began to use tactics that involved censorship – including a total media blackout – and violence. The protesters, whose groups had once found success in communicating their message through social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, turned silent as those resources were made inaccessible to them. Armed Basij – members of a force controlled directly by Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and the Iranian Revolutionary Guards – were sent to raid universities and disperse the masses that had gathered on the streets of Tehran.

While many aspects of the situation remain uncertain, there have been at least 28 confirmed and 150 unconfirmed deaths resulting from the election protests and subsequent government response.

The Role of Satellite Imaging

When situations such as media blackouts occur and photographs cannot be reliably obtained, satellite images can provide an aerial perspective that is unmatched by any alternate medium. High-resolution satellite imagery, such as that which is produced by the GeoEye-1, IKONOS, and QuickBird satellite sensors, is capable of revealing crucial details that might otherwise remain inaccessible or unnoticed. This critical imagery also enables interested parties, such as foreign state departments, to maintain a clear and objective overview of the event as it unfolds.

Satellite Imaging Corporation specializes in high quality GIS products and satellite imagery, whose applications include defense and intelligence mapping, homeland security, and law enforcement.

Satellite Imaging Corporation using GeoEye-1 Satellite Sensor to acquire Stereo Imagery at 0.5m Resolution for Production of 2m Digital Elevation Models (DEMs)

Monday, March 9th, 2009

With the successful launch of GeoEye-1 satellite sensor from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on September 6, 2008 at 11:50:57 Hrs (PST), successful completion of testing and calibration GeoEye released the satellite for commercial orders on February 5, 2009.

Since February 5, 2009, Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC) received orders from various customers to acquire new GeoEye-1 mono and stereo satellite imagery with image resolution of 0.5 meter supporting county tax mapping, engineering/ construction, mining, land development and natural resources management.

Satellite imagery is used for many GIS and CAD applications requiring detailed up-to-date image data for planning purposes and change detection. For three-dimensional (3D) applications, Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), and contours can be delivered through high cost aircraft based LiDAR surveys. But with constricted budgets, elevation data is sometimes obtained from old and unreliable data sources with 10 meter or 30 meter postings. For international project planning, many exploration and engineering companies are limited to 30m ASTER DEM data sets or Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 90 meter DEM data to have access to digital terrain models. When local topographic maps are available at a suitable scale, elevation contours are sometimes extracted from the topographic maps.

0_ikonos3mdsm1

3 Meter IKONOS DSM – Pipeline Corridor

The GeoEye-1 and IKONOS satellite sensors provide the best solution for organizations and companies requiring cost-effective high-resolution image data and Digital Terrain Models (DTMs).

“With the increased geo-location position accuracy of the GeoEye-1 satellite sensor the number of required GPS derived Ground Control Points (GCP’s) can be drastically reduced, thereby reducing operational cost and security risks in foreign countries, making the GeoEye-1 satellite sensor a platform of choice to acquire 0.5 meter high-resolution imagery and DEM products.” said Leopold Romeijn, President of Satellite Imaging Corporation.

Covering large areas a horizontal position accuracy of <1 meter can be obtained with just one or two GCP’s, and without any GCP’s, geo-location accuracies of <5 meter can be achieved depending on terrain conditions and collection geometry during the time of image data collection.

GIS and CAD professionals are now able to work with satellite imagery at 0.5 meter resolution, 2 meter digital raster DEMs, 1 meter elevation contours and TIN models, thereby facilitating a 3D computer work environments, supporting the planning and construction of roads, facilities, pipelines and many other project applications.