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Archive for the ‘GIS’ Category

Virunga National Parks Mountain Gorillas Threatened as Fighting Continues

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Virunga National Parks and its endangered mountain gorillas are threatened once again in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) as rebels clash with the Congolese army in the park’s gorilla sector. The gorillas have been caught in a deadly crossfire for years and the bloody conflict is complicated by the pressures of a surging refugee population and an illegal charcoal trade decimating the park that are threatening the gorillas’ lives.

Virunga National Park is home to about 200 of the world’s remaining 783 mountain gorillas and are not frequently hunted for their meat, but can be maimed or killed by poachers leaving traps or snares for other animals. They have also been killed for their body parts to be sold to collectors.

Photo Credit: Professor Richard S. Muller

Satellite Imaging Technology Supports Monitoring of the Endangered Mountain Gorillas

Satellite images provide extremely useful information to Conservationists, Scientists and Researchers in viewing out-of-the-way remote places. Conservationists, for example, must monitor far-flung areas in need of protection. Wars, poverty, remoteness, lack of government involvement, and uncertainty over the best places and ways to focus limited resources can all hinder conservation efforts. Satellite imagery is giving scientists and conservationists some of the tools they need to get valuable information on land cover and land use changes in wild areas that are in need of protection.

3D Fly-through Simulation of Visoke Volcano in

Virunga National Parks (DRC and Rwanda)

1m Stereo IKONOS Satellite Image Data and 5m DTM

Copyright © GeoEye and Satellite Imaging Corporation)

To watch video click on image.

Read our stories on Virunga National Parks:

Satellite Images and GIS Supports Conservation Efforts in Virunga National Parks, Africa

Virunga National Parks Gorilla Murders – Caught in the Line of Fire – Satellite Imaging Update

Satellite Image of Mount Nyamulagira Volcano in Virunga National Parks

For further information and news visit Wildlife Direct to read the latest up to minute news about the mountain gorillas.

About Satellite Imaging  Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company, provides global satellite imaging and processing services for a number of industries, including oil and gas, mining, cadastre, tax mapping, construction, environmental, forestry and agriculture.

The company specializes in high and medium resolution satellite imaging products and technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS and CAD applications including, environmental studies, culture extraction, exploration for natural resources, engineering/construction utilizing high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data and specialized Image processing techniques.

Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Pleiades-1A Satellite Captures First Panchromatic Images

Monday, January 9th, 2012

Pleiades-1 (0.5m) satellite sensor captured the first panchromatic satellite images after its successful launch from Kourou launch site (French Guiana) via a Russian Soyuz ST rocket on December 16, 2011. The launch marked a new step in French-Russian cooperation: it is the second time when the Russian launch vehicle “Soyuz-ST” took off from the French site. The Pléiades system was designed under the French-Italian ORFEO program (Optical & Radar Federated Earth Observation) between 2001 and 2003.

Pleiades-1 will represent the first very high-resolution satellite from SPOT and will be capable of providing orthorectified color data at 0.5-meter resolution (roughly comparable to GeoEye-1) and revisiting any point on Earth as it covers a total of 1 million square kilometers (approximately 386,102 square miles) daily. Perhaps most importantly, Pleiades-1 will be capable of acquiring high-resolution stereo imagery in just one pass, and can accommodate large areas (up to 1,000 km x 1,000 km).

satellite image pleaides 1 Casablanca Mosquee

Pleaides-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image of Casablanca Mosque

To view in high resolution click image.

(Image credit: CNES)

pleiasdes-1 satellite photo SanFrancisco Airport

Pleaides-1 (0.5m) Satellite Image of San Francisco Airport

To view in high resolution click image.

(Image credit: CNES)

To view more Pleiades-1 Satellite Images, visit here.

The Pléiades constellation is composed of two very-high-resolution optical Earth-imaging satellites. Pléiades-1 and Pléiades-2 will provide coverage of Earth’s surface with a repeat cycle of 26 days. Their great agility enables a daily access all over the world, which is a critical need for defense and civil security applications, and a coverage capacity necessary for the cartography kind of applications at scales better than those accessible to SPOT family satellites. Moreover, Pleiades have stereoscopic acquisition capacity to meet the fine cartography needs, notably in urban regions. Pléiades-2 will launch in mid-2012.

Pleiades-1 Satellite SensorPleaides-1 Satellite Sensor

(Image credit: Astrium/CNES)

The satellite will feature four spectral bands (blue, green, red, and IR), as well as image location accuracy of 4.5m (CE90) without ground control points, a wide swath of a scene (20 km, whereas the best US remote sensing satellites have 11-16 km of swath width). Image location accuracy can be improved even further — up to an exceptional 1 meter — by the use of GCPs. Because the satellite has been designed with urgent tasking in mind, images can be requested from Pleiades-1 less then six hours before they are acquired. This functionality will prove invaluable in situations where the expedited collection of new image data is crucial, such as crisis monitoring.

Furthermore, Pleiades constellation offers new services delivering precise geospatial information in record time and capabilities that marks a  shift in the Earth imaging sector. With 450 images acquired every day by each satellite, five acquisition scenarios, and three daily tasking plans, the Pleiades system is tailored to meet the needs of real-time applications.

To view specifications on the Pleiades-1, visit here.

To watch a video of the Pleiades-1 satellite launch, visit here.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company, provides global satellite imaging and processing services for a number of industries, including oil and gas, mining, cadastre, tax mapping, construction, environmental, forestry and agriculture.

The company specializes in high and medium resolution satellite imaging products and technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS and CAD applications including, environmental studies, culture extraction, exploration for natural resources, engineering/construction utilizing high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data and specialized Image processing techniques.

Satellite Imaging Corporation
36842 Meadow Creek Court
Magnolia, Texas 77355-8603
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900 Ext.: 202
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

IKONOS Satellite Sensor Celebrates Its 11th Year In Orbit

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

IKONOS the world’s first commercial high-resolution Earth observing Satellite celebrates its 11th year in orbit. The IKONOS Satellite sensor was designed and built by Lockheed Martin and is operated by GeoEye.

IKONOS was launched on September 24, 1999 with a 0.82 meter resolution capable of capturing a 3.28m multispectral, Near-Infrared (NIR) at nadir. Its applications include environmental monitoring, government, homeland security, tax mapping, mining, land management, disaster relief and other geospatial applications. The spacecraft continues to collect black-and-white imagery while simultaneously collecting multispectral data for more than four years beyond its initial design life.

To view high resolution satellite images from the IKONOS satellite visit here.

ikonos satellite sensor earth observing

IKONOS Satellite Sensor (Image courtesy: GeoEye)

IKONOS Stereo Satellite Imagery

The IKONOS Satellite sensor can be programmed to acquire Stereo Imagery for the production of Digital Surface Models (DSM’s) or Digital Elevation Models (DEM’s) with postings of 2m – 3m. From the Stereo pair the near Nadir scene will be utilized to produce <1m Natural Color Satellite Image mosaic.

Other Sensors Operated by GeoEye

GeoEye-1

GeoEye-1 launched on September 6, 2008 is capable of acquiring image data at 0.41 meter panchromatic (B&W) and 1.64 meter multispectral resolution. It also features a revisit time of less than three days, as well as the ability to locate an object within just three meters of its physical location.

This sensor is optimized for large projects, as it can collect over 350,000 square kilometers of pan-sharpened multispectral Satellite imagery every day.

geoeye-1 satellite sensor earth observing

GeoEye-1 Satellite Sensor (Image courtesy: GeoEye)

GeoEye-2

Lockheed Martin Space Systems is progressing steadily under a contract to design, build, and launch GeoEye’s next-generation, commercial Earth-imaging satellite, known as GeoEye-2. GeoEye-2 will be launched aboard an Atlas V rocket provided by Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services and will be operational in early 2013.

The GeoEye-2 Satellite sensor will benefit from significant improvements in capability, including enhanced direct tasking, and the potential to collect imagery of the Earth’s surface at 0.25-meter or 9.75-inch ground resolution.

GeoEye-2 satellite sensor earth observing

GeoEye-2 Satellite Sensor (Image courtesy: GeoEye)

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
36842 Meadow Creek Court
Magnolia, Texas  77355-8603
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Images Supports Gulf Oil Spill Response and Cleanup

Friday, June 25th, 2010

Satellite images support the Gulf of Mexico oil spill response and cleanup with spill mapping including documenting the condition of coastal wetlands before oil landfall. Satellite imagery will assist  response teams in forecasting the trajectory of the oil and in documenting changes in the ecosystem.

Satellites can document the overall extent of the oil but cannot distinguish between the sheen and thick patches. While the sheen represents most of the area of the slick, the majority of the oil is concentrated in the thicker part. Satellite images should be able to identify the thicker parts, helping oil spill responders know where to deploy oil-skimming boats and absorbent booms.

satellite image gulf_mexico_oil_slick geoeye-1

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image of Gulf Oil Spill

(Image Credit: GeoEye)

This half-meter resolution satellite image (above) features a portion of the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico. Streaks of oil blown by wind and currents can easily be seen against the darker colored water. The image was taken by the GeoEye-1 satellite from 423 miles in space on April 29, 2010 as it moved from north to south over the United States at a speed of four miles per second.

Transocean Deepwater Horizon Drilling rig oil slick, Gulf of Mex

QuickBird Satellite Image of Gulf Oil Spill

(Image Credit: DigitalGlobe)

wv-2 satellite image gulf oil spill clean up

WorldView-2 Satellite Image of Gulf Oil Spill

(Image Credit: DigitalGlobe)

Researchers also plan to measure changes in vegetation along the coastline and assess where and how oil may be affecting marshes, swamps, bayous, and beaches that are difficult to survey on the ground.

Researchers and scientists will be:

* Collecting satellite imagery to assess the impact on wetlands and coasts
* Developing maps showing NOAA projections of spill trajectory with respect to DOI Lands
* Collecting samples to ascertain source and levels of toxicity to soils and water systems
* Conducting tests to determine cause of mortality of wildlife
* Developing models that depict how local tidal and current conditions will interact with seafloor bathymetry to carry oil over barrier islands
* Providing decision support tools to help DOI land managers mitigate the effects of the oil spill and assist in restoration efforts

worldview-2 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill satellite photo

WorldView-2 Satellite Image of Gulf Oil Spill

(Image Credit: DigitalGlobe)

This is an enhanced satellite image of the oil spill and clean up effort in the Gulf of Mexico.

This image leverages the different sensor bands of the WorldView-2 satellite to highlight the oil and dispersant.

The oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon oil rig occurred after an explosion on April 20, 2010 and various methods of containing the oil spill have been developed, including controlled burns, domes over the oil spill, and the use of remotely operated vehicles to manipulate equipment on the sea floor.

To watch a time lapse video of satellite images of the Gulf Oil Spill visit here.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including engineering and construction, homeland security, defense, intelligence and disaster response using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
36842 Meadow Creek Court
Magnolia, Texas  77355-8603
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Image of Mount Nyamulagira Volcano in Virunga National Parks

Saturday, January 16th, 2010

Satellite image view of Mount Nyamulagira volcano that erupted earlier this month in Eastern Congo threatening villagers and Virunga National Park, home to rare chimpanzees and critically endangered mountain gorillas.

Virunga National Parks nyamulagira volcano

Landsat 7 Satellite Image of Virunga National Parks

Mount Nyamulagira

Nyamulagira (also known as Nyamuragira) is one of Africa’s most active volcanoes, if not the most active that last erupted in 2006. About 25 kilometers north of Lake Kivu, and located to the northwest of Nyiragongo Volcano, it contrasts with its tall, steep-sided neighbor. Nyamulagira is relatively short. It is a shield volcano with gentle slopes. Shield volcanoes derive their name from their resemblance to metal shields warriors once used. Major eruptions at Nyamulagira have occurred recently enough to change the volcano caldera’s structure since the early 20th century.

More on Virunga National Parks including Satellite Images

To view Thermal Maps of Volcano eruption go here

Watch Video of Eruption

Latest News (January 25, 2010) on Nyamulagira

Virunga National Park contains within 790,000 hectares the greatest diversity of habitats of any park in Africa, from steppes, savannas and lava plains, swamps, lowland and forests to volcanoes. Thousands of hippopotamuses and elephants live in the park’s rivers and its mountains are a critical area for the survival of the mountain and lowland gorillas.

3D Flythrough Movie – Visoke Volcano

3d fly through virunga national parks visoke volcano

1m Stereo IKONOS Satellite Image Data and 5m DTM

The Virunga National Park lies from the Virunga Mountains to the Rwenzori Mountains in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo which borders the Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda and Rwenzori Mountains National Park in Uganda. Covering 7,800 Km2 it was established in 1925 as Africa’s first national park and classified as a World Heritage Site in 1979. It has become well known for its, poaching and civil wars in the region that have seriously damaged its wildlife population.

Remote Sensing for Natural Disasters

Satellite imagery and aerial photography incorporated with geographic information systems (GIS), can give researchers and emergency officials a wealth of information for assessment, analysis and monitoring of natural disasters such as volcano damage from small to large regions around the globe.

Volcanic studies can be organized into three phases:

1. Detection and classification

2. Monitoring activity of existing volcanoes

3. Analysis of eruption in spatial distribution and temporal distribution

Remote Sensing gives state and government agencies the ability to view the damage from multiple vantage points. The spatial resolution of an image determines the ability to view individual features such as morphological features, suitable for eruption warning and for detecting plumes and lava flows. It also affects the ability to monitor and assess damage conditions, and depends on the nature of the hazard itself.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including engineering and construction, homeland security, defense, intelligence and disaster response using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Images Capture Construction of Iran’s Hidden Nuclear Site Near Qom

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

The GeoEye-1 satellite sensor captured Iran’s hidden nuclear site under construction near Qom in September of 2009. Hidden in the hills, construction was started at the uranium enrichment site during 2006. The complex is on a military base controlled by Iran, making access difficult. But through information from satellite imagery, Iranian dissidents and other human intelligence, a sufficiently detailed picture was built up to convince investigators that Iran was preparing to make nuclear fuel there.

satellite image Iran nuclear site Qom

The IKONOS satellite sensor collected this 0.8m Satellite Image on February 5, 2000 showing pre-construction and imagery from the GeoEye-1 satellite (below) shows present construction. GeoEye-1 image taken on September 26, 2009 from 423 miles in space as Virginia based GeoEye’s newest satellite, GeoEye-1, moved from north to south over the Middle East at a speed of 7.5 km per second.

satellite image nuclear site Qom_iran

satellite image Qom_iran hidden nuclear facility

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image Detailed View of Uranium Enrichment Site – Qom, Iran

To view a video of zoomed in high resolution details of site go here

According to IHS Janes, who did the analysis of the imagery, the imagery shows a well fortified facility with a main entrance, which was seen under construction early this year, and is now a building that abuts and provides access into the mountain. Small round ventilation shafts in the center of the mountain are near completion. Quarry equipment, a surface-to-air missile site, and more construction equipment surround the mountain. This facility is still under construction.

The small-scale site discovered near Qom is meant to house no more than 3,000 centrifuges. The enriching machines in Qom facility will produce nuclear fuel, which could possibly be further enriched into material for atomic warheads.

The global standoff over Iran’s nuclear program began in 2002 with the discovery of two large nuclear facilities in Natanz and Arak. Tehran insists its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes to generate electricity. Iran says it has built the facility inside a mountain next to a military site to protect its nuclear activities in case of an attack by the US or Israel.

Iran’s Existing Nuclear Sites

Arak – Heavy Water Plant

A 40 MWt heavy water moderated research reactor which should be ready for commissioning in 2014.

Natanz – Uranium Enrichment Plant

This once secret site was one of the two exposed by Alireza Jafarzadeh in August, 2002. Under the terms of Iran’s safeguards agreement, Iran was under no obligation to report the existence of the site while it was still under construction. There are currently approximately 7,000 centrifuges installed at Natanz, of which 5,000 are producing low enriched uranium.

Isfahan- Uranium Conversion Plant

A nuclear research facility that currently operates four small nuclear research reactors, all supplied by China.  The Uranium Conversion Facility at Isfahan converts yellowcake into uranium hexafluoride. As of late October 2004, the site is 70% operational with 21 of 24 workshops completed. There is also a Zirconium Production Plant (ZPP) located nearby that produces the necessary ingredients and alloys for nuclear reactors.

Bushehr – Nuclear Power Station

Construction was completed in March 2009. The plant is planned to begin production by August 22, 2009 and would be brought up to full capacity by the end of March 2010.

Watch video of  New York Post – Iran: The Nuclear Question

Latest News Update (November 17, 2009) – Russia delays Iranian reactor, Turkey awaits response on uranium storage

News Update (November 27, 2009) – Iran rebuked over nuclear ‘cover-up’ by UN watchdog

Governments and private enterprises throughout the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, are quickly learning the value of Remote Sensing and GIS in maximizing security programs. This type of information can enable local governments to better assess and understand how to develop programs to save lives, protect property and enhance the future economic stability of their communities. The current threats to a country range from incidents of terrorism and information attacks on critical infrastructure to the potential use of weapons of mass destruction. Each one of these threats could cause massive casualties and disruption to a country.

By combining satellite imagery and terrain elevation databases from high resolution satellite images from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2, Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS and SPOT-5 realistic and true-color 3D terrain visualizations can be created of any location on Earth for flight training, battlefield management, mission rehearsal, research, and other activities which provide vital information for aerial mission planners and command information systems. To view a 3d Fly Through flight simulations of another nuclear site go here.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including engineering and construction, homeland security, defense, intelligence and disaster response using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Remote Sensing Data Aid in Monitoring Global Desertification

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

Remote sensing earth observation (EO) satellites provide significant contributions to desertification assessment and monitoring, particularly by providing the spatial information needed for regional-scale analysis of the relationships between climate change, land degradation and desertification processes.

geoeye-1 satellite image desertification china desert

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image of Gobi Desert, China

Image Credit: GeoEye

Gobi desert is expanding at an alarming rate. The expansion is particularly rapid on the southern edge into China. Dust storms, which used to occur regularly in China, have seen a dramatic increase in occurrence in the past 20 years, mainly due to desertification, and causing further damage to China’s agriculture economy.

Desertification, land degradation and drought deprive people of food and water and force millions to leave their homes. Desertification refers to the creation of new deserts through the degradation of drylands, which cover 40% of the world’s land surface. Land degradation, caused by over-cultivation, over-grazing, deforestation and inefficient irrigation, affects roughly 20% of Earth’s drylands.

Satellite imaging technology has been  recognized as playing an important role in achieving this objective by using these methods for monitoring the areas most at risk to support land and water management decisions.

Earth observation (EO) satellite technologies allow land degradation processes to be monitored over time. Monitoring desertification, land degradation and droughts requires continuous evaluation, some of which can be retrieved with earth observation technologies and state-of-the-art geo-spatial applications.

landsat satellite image lake mead drought

Landsat satellite image series from Lake Mead, we can see the diminishing water level of the reservoir between the 1990s and 2009. The red color in the lower right image shows where the water level has dropped. These false-color images use TM bands 7,4,2.

Credit: NASA/USGS

High-spectral resolution satellite imagery can dramatically increase the accuracy of dryland monitoring. Hyperspectral imagery incorporated with field and laboratory data for analysis can be used to derive more quantitative and specific soil properties directly linked to soil degradation status, such as soil chemical properties, organic matter, mineralogical content, infiltration capacity, aggregation capacity, and runoff coefficient.

Combining satellite image data with weather data, numeric models and geographical information systems (GIS) are used to create standardized geo-information products.

Satellite Image data is expected to contribute to a wide array of global change-related application areas for vegetation and ecosystem dynamics, hazard monitoring, geology and soil analysis, land surface climatology, hydrology, land cover change, and the generation of orthorectified digital elevation models (DEMs).

Satellite imagery analysis allows for:

  • Fast and accurate overview
  • Quantitative green vegetation assessment
  • Underlying soil characteristics

Satellite remote sensing is an evolving technology with the potential for contributing to studies for land cover and change detection by making globally comprehensive evaluations of many environmental and human actions possible. These changes, in turn, influence management and policy decision making. Satellite image data enables direct observation of the land surface at repetitive intervals and therefore allow mapping of the extent and monitoring and assessment of:

  • Crop health
  • Storm Water Runoff
  • Change detection
  • Air Quality
  • Environmental analysis
  • Energy Savings
  • Irrigated landscape mapping
  • Carbon Storage and Avoidance
  • Yield determination
  • Soils and Fertility Analysis
  • Identification

quickbird satellite image landcover vegetation soil index

About Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite image processing techniques and produce seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaic DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS applications including, flight simulations and terrain modeling for your specific project needs.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910

Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Mineral Exploration Using Satellite Images for Geological Applications

Wednesday, October 28th, 2009

Satellite Remote Sensing has been a standard first step for the mineral and petroleum exploration industry. Satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2, QuickBird, IKONOS, ASTER and LANDSAT 7 +ETM have benefited geologists, scientists and exploration managers in earth sciences due to the advantage of large scale mapping and the sensors containing multiple band colors which allows them to interpret wavelengths that cannot be seen by the human eye, such as near infrared, short wave infrared and thermal infrared to identify the difference in structural features of the earth’s surface.

ikonos satellite image nevada-mining

IKONOS Satellite Image of Mining Operations in Nevada

Multispectral imaging and thematic mapping allows researchers to collect data of reflection and absorption properties of soils, rock, and vegetation. This data could be utilized to interpret actual surface lithology to identify clays, oxides and soils from satellite images.

The use of satellite imagery in mineral exploration, generally a combination of panchromatic and multispectral image data has been used in mineral and petroleum industries over the last decade. With higher resolution satellite sensors increasing over the last decade such as GeoEye-1 (0.41m) and WorldView-2 (0.46m) both providing panchromatic and multispectral full color imagery that is used to utilize enhanced spectral analysis for mapping, monitoring and analyzing landcover classification and extraction of culture data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) classification and mapping, lithological classification, change detection, environmental monitoringdevelopment, land-use planning, visualization and simulation environments such as digital elevation models (DEMs) and 3d terrain modeling.

aster satellite image mining escondida chile

ASTER (15m) Satellite Images of Escondida open-pit mine in Atacama Desert, Chile

aster satellite image mining escondida chile

This ASTER image covers 30 by 37 km in the Atacama Desert, Chile and was acquired on April 23, 2000. The Escondida Cu-Au-Ag open-pit mine is at an elevation of 3050 m, and came on stream in 1990. Escondida is related geologically to three porphyry bodies intruded along the Chilean West Fissure Fault System. A high grade supergene cap overlies primary sulfide ore. The top image is a conventional 3-2-1 RGB composite. The bottom image displays SWIR bands 4-6-8 in RGB, and highlights lithologic and alteration differences of surface units. Imagery Credit: NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

Geologists and Geoscientists have used satellite images to serve as databases from which they can do the following:

  • Pick out rock units (stratigraphy)
  • Study the expression and modes of the origin of landforms (geomorphology)
  • Determine the structural arrangements of disturbed strata (folds and faults)
  • Evaluate dynamic changes from natural events (e.g., floods; volcanic eruptions)
  • Seek surface clues (such as alteration and other signs of mineralization) to subsurface deposits of ore minerals, oil and gas, and groundwater.
  • Function as a visual base on which a geologic map is drawn either directly or on a transparent overlay.

digital elevation model argyle_view_diamond_mine_3d

ASTER Satellite Image of Argyle Diamond Mine, Australia- DEM

A well collated and structured data base integrated into a powerful GIS project can be used to collect and create valuable data for the planning and exploration program for:

  1. The advantage of creating large scale area maps which allows them to examine in single scenes or in mosaics the geological portrayal of Earth on a regional basis.
  2. The ability to analyze multispectral bands quantitatively in terms of numbers permits them to apply special image processing techniques to discern and enhance certain compositional properties of Earth materials.
  3. The capability of merging different types of remote sensing products (e.g., reflectance images with radar or with thermal imagery) or combining these with topographic elevation data (DEMs) and with other kinds of information bases (e.g., thematic maps; geophysical measurements and chemical sampling surveys) enables views of existing or planning of proposed mines.
  4. Mapping subregional surface geology.
  5. Creating field exploration maps with detailed views of access roads.

Remote sensed data and GIS for mineral exploration is a key to management, planning and monitoring programs requiring on accurate information about the land cover in a region. Methods for monitoring vegetation and land change range from intensive field sampling with plot inventories to extensive analysis of remotely sensed data which has proven to be more cost effective for large regions, small site assessment and analysis.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation;

Satellite Imaging Corporation provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite image processing techniques and produce seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaic DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS applications including, flight simulations and terrain modeling for your specific project needs.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910

Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

WorldView-2 Captures First High Resolution Full Color Satellite Images!

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

WorldView-2 satellite captured its first pan-sharpened, multispectral images at (0.46 meter resolution) from almost 500 miles above the Earth. These images supply unprecedented detail and geospatial accuracy, further expanding the applications for satellite imagery in both commercial and government markets. Added spectral diversity provides the ability to perform precise change detection and mapping.

WorldView-2 Dallas Texas Love Airfield Satellite Image

WorldView-2 Satellite Image (0.5m) of Dallas Love Airfield, Texas USA

WorldView-2 First Image-San Antonio, Texas

WorldView-2 Satellite Image (0.5m) of San Antonio Conference Center, Texas USA

WorldView-2 sensor provides a high resolution Panchromatic band and eight (8) Multispectral bands; four (4) standard colors (red, green, blue, and near-infrared 1) and four (4) new bands (coastal, yellow, red edge, and near-infrared 2), full-color images for enhanced spectral analysis, mapping and monitoring applications, land-use planning, disaster relief, exploration, defense and intelligence, visualization and simulation environments.

worldview_2_spectral_bands

DigitalGlobe’s WorldView-2 was launched successfully on October 8, 2009 11:52 am at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, U.S.A. With its improved agility, WorldView-2 is able to act like a paintbrush, sweeping back and forth to collect very large areas of multispectral imagery in a single pass. WorldView-2 alone is able to collect nearly 1 million km2 every day, doubling the collection capacity of our constellation to nearly 2 million km2 per day. And the combination of WorldView-2’s increased agility and high altitude enables it to typically revisit any place on earth in 1.1 days. When added to the satellite constellation, revisit time drops below one day and never exceeds two days, providing the most same-day passes of any commercial high resolution constellation.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company, provides global satellite imaging and processing services for a number of industries, including oil and gas, mining, cadastre, tax mapping, construction, environmental, forestry and agriculture.

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including, flight simulations, terrain modeling, engineering and construction using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data such as GeoEye-1, Worldview-1, QuickBird and IKONOS.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: http://www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Images and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) Help Monitor Global Warming and Climate Change

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

The Earth, our home in space, is a varied and dynamic place. Since the beginning of human history we have sought a better understanding of the world around us. With the new technology of the aerospace age and satellite image technology, we can look back and appreciate the diversity and the beauty of the Earth in a way not possible until the 20th century.

geoeye-1 satellite

Geoeye-1 Satellite Sensor – Panchromatic and Multispectral Imaging

Copyright GeoEye

Since 1990′s a new generation of satellite sensors with powerful capabilities have been launched to collect massive amounts of data about our planet and the many changes it has experienced.

There are dozens of remote sensing satellites orbiting the Earth collecting invaluable information about the Earth’s surface, oceans and the atmosphere and how they interact. Satellite images have been collected for scientific and technical purposes as well as just appreciating its simple beauty. These satellites collect information that our eyes cannot, collections from 30M to 0.5M resolution is now available.

Satellite images provide important land coverage information for mapping and classification of land cover features, such as vegetation, soil, water and forests for monitoring and managing Earth’s vital natural resources and the current global climate changes.

satellite image typhoon morakot Taiwan

Typhoon Morakot, Tawain – QuickBird Satellite Image (0.61m)

Copyright DigitalGlobe

The Earth’s climate has changed throughout history. From glacial periods (or “ice ages”) where ice covered significant portions of the Earth to interglacial periods where ice retreated to the poles or melted entirely – the climate and the Earth has continuously changed.

The shallow end of the Glaciers are melting swiftly. Glaciologists have determined that areas of the glacial lobe were 98 feet lower in 2004 than they were in 2000. That’s double the rate of pre-1999 thinning.

landsat satellite image

Landsat Satellite Image of Antarctica

The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years.

Scientists have been able to piece together a picture of the Earth’s climate dating back decades to millions of years ago by analyzing a number of surrogate, or “proxy,” measures of climate such as ice cores, boreholes, tree rings, glacier lengths, pollen remains, and ocean sediments, and by studying changes in the Earth’s orbit around the sun.

To view a Tour of Our Cryosphere (Glacial Melting) go here.

Deforestation in Bolivia, SA from 1975 to 2000

San Bernadino, CA Wildfires

Deforestation of Rondonia, Brazil from 1975 to 2009

Five-Year Average Global Temperature Anomalies for 1888,1918,1948,1978, 2008

Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about our planet and its climate on a global scale. Studying this data collected over many years reveal the signals of a changing climate.

Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere will increase during the next century unless greenhouse gas emissions decrease substantially from present levels. Increased greenhouse gas concentrations are very likely to raise the Earth’s average temperature, influence precipitation and increase in storm patterns as well as raise sea levels. The magnitude of these changes, however, is uncertain.

Digital Elevation Models

Satellite images allow scientists to remove vegetation, water and geological cover from the image data which allows them to produce the most detailed available Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of landscape topography. The creation of DEMs will revolutionize geological applications, land-use studies, soil science, and much more to better understand the global climate changes occurring around the world.

eritrea africa dem

Eritrea, Africa – IKONOS Satellite Image over 6m IKONOS Stereo DEM

Digital elevation models provide details about landscape features which in result, will allow us to clearly make out the shape of our landscape and understand how water, ice, and  soil might move across its surface, how it came to be its present shape and how rapidly the changes are occurring.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC) delivers 3D terrain models with posting intervals from 3m to 90m. The high resolution <1m Satellite imaging mosaics and 3m-5m DEMs provide operators with the appropriate planning tools to reduce the risk of environmental impact during operations and improve on safety procedures. SIC provides a large amount of satellite remote sensing data at different spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions from sensors such as GeoEye-1, Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5, LANDSAT and ASTER, by using the appropriate combination of bands to bring out the geographical and manmade features that are most pertinent to your project for detecting and monitoring changes.

Satellite Imaging Corporation combines orthorectified satellite images and digital aerial photography mosaics with extracted vector and client-supplied attribute data to create single, data-rich images for GIS and other mapping applications to achieve a multi-layered result for many types of analysis.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com