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Archive for the ‘LANDSAT’ Category

Satellite Image of Mount Nyamulagira Volcano in Virunga National Parks

Saturday, January 16th, 2010

Satellite image view of Mount Nyamulagira volcano that erupted earlier this month in Eastern Congo threatening villagers and Virunga National Park, home to rare chimpanzees and critically endangered mountain gorillas.

Virunga National Parks nyamulagira volcano

Landsat 7 Satellite Image of Virunga National Parks

Mount Nyamulagira

Nyamulagira (also known as Nyamuragira) is one of Africa’s most active volcanoes, if not the most active that last erupted in 2006. About 25 kilometers north of Lake Kivu, and located to the northwest of Nyiragongo Volcano, it contrasts with its tall, steep-sided neighbor. Nyamulagira is relatively short. It is a shield volcano with gentle slopes. Shield volcanoes derive their name from their resemblance to metal shields warriors once used. Major eruptions at Nyamulagira have occurred recently enough to change the volcano caldera’s structure since the early 20th century.

More on Virunga National Parks including Satellite Images

To view Thermal Maps of Volcano eruption go here

Watch Video of Eruption

Latest News (January 25, 2010) on Nyamulagira

Virunga National Park contains within 790,000 hectares the greatest diversity of habitats of any park in Africa, from steppes, savannas and lava plains, swamps, lowland and forests to volcanoes. Thousands of hippopotamuses and elephants live in the park’s rivers and its mountains are a critical area for the survival of the mountain and lowland gorillas.

3D Flythrough Movie – Visoke Volcano

3d fly through virunga national parks visoke volcano

1m Stereo IKONOS Satellite Image Data and 5m DTM

The Virunga National Park lies from the Virunga Mountains to the Rwenzori Mountains in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo which borders the Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda and Rwenzori Mountains National Park in Uganda. Covering 7,800 Km2 it was established in 1925 as Africa’s first national park and classified as a World Heritage Site in 1979. It has become well known for its, poaching and civil wars in the region that have seriously damaged its wildlife population.

Remote Sensing for Natural Disasters

Satellite imagery and aerial photography incorporated with geographic information systems (GIS), can give researchers and emergency officials a wealth of information for assessment, analysis and monitoring of natural disasters such as volcano damage from small to large regions around the globe.

Volcanic studies can be organized into three phases:

1. Detection and classification

2. Monitoring activity of existing volcanoes

3. Analysis of eruption in spatial distribution and temporal distribution

Remote Sensing gives state and government agencies the ability to view the damage from multiple vantage points. The spatial resolution of an image determines the ability to view individual features such as morphological features, suitable for eruption warning and for detecting plumes and lava flows. It also affects the ability to monitor and assess damage conditions, and depends on the nature of the hazard itself.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company that provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including engineering and construction, homeland security, defense, intelligence and disaster response using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Remote Sensing Data Aid in Monitoring Global Desertification

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

Remote sensing earth observation (EO) satellites provide significant contributions to desertification assessment and monitoring, particularly by providing the spatial information needed for regional-scale analysis of the relationships between climate change, land degradation and desertification processes.

geoeye-1 satellite image desertification china desert

GeoEye-1 Satellite Image of Gobi Desert, China

Image Credit: GeoEye

Gobi desert is expanding at an alarming rate. The expansion is particularly rapid on the southern edge into China. Dust storms, which used to occur regularly in China, have seen a dramatic increase in occurrence in the past 20 years, mainly due to desertification, and causing further damage to China’s agriculture economy.

Desertification, land degradation and drought deprive people of food and water and force millions to leave their homes. Desertification refers to the creation of new deserts through the degradation of drylands, which cover 40% of the world’s land surface. Land degradation, caused by over-cultivation, over-grazing, deforestation and inefficient irrigation, affects roughly 20% of Earth’s drylands.

Satellite imaging technology has been  recognized as playing an important role in achieving this objective by using these methods for monitoring the areas most at risk to support land and water management decisions.

Earth observation (EO) satellite technologies allow land degradation processes to be monitored over time. Monitoring desertification, land degradation and droughts requires continuous evaluation, some of which can be retrieved with earth observation technologies and state-of-the-art geo-spatial applications.

landsat satellite image lake mead drought

Landsat satellite image series from Lake Mead, we can see the diminishing water level of the reservoir between the 1990s and 2009. The red color in the lower right image shows where the water level has dropped. These false-color images use TM bands 7,4,2.

Credit: NASA/USGS

High-spectral resolution satellite imagery can dramatically increase the accuracy of dryland monitoring. Hyperspectral imagery incorporated with field and laboratory data for analysis can be used to derive more quantitative and specific soil properties directly linked to soil degradation status, such as soil chemical properties, organic matter, mineralogical content, infiltration capacity, aggregation capacity, and runoff coefficient.

Combining satellite image data with weather data, numeric models and geographical information systems (GIS) are used to create standardized geo-information products.

Satellite Image data is expected to contribute to a wide array of global change-related application areas for vegetation and ecosystem dynamics, hazard monitoring, geology and soil analysis, land surface climatology, hydrology, land cover change, and the generation of orthorectified digital elevation models (DEMs).

Satellite imagery analysis allows for:

  • Fast and accurate overview
  • Quantitative green vegetation assessment
  • Underlying soil characteristics

Satellite remote sensing is an evolving technology with the potential for contributing to studies for land cover and change detection by making globally comprehensive evaluations of many environmental and human actions possible. These changes, in turn, influence management and policy decision making. Satellite image data enables direct observation of the land surface at repetitive intervals and therefore allow mapping of the extent and monitoring and assessment of:

  • Crop health
  • Storm Water Runoff
  • Change detection
  • Air Quality
  • Environmental analysis
  • Energy Savings
  • Irrigated landscape mapping
  • Carbon Storage and Avoidance
  • Yield determination
  • Soils and Fertility Analysis
  • Identification

quickbird satellite image landcover vegetation soil index

About Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite image processing techniques and produce seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaic DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS applications including, flight simulations and terrain modeling for your specific project needs.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910

Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Mineral Exploration Using Satellite Images for Geological Applications

Wednesday, October 28th, 2009

Satellite Remote Sensing has been a standard first step for the mineral and petroleum exploration industry. Satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2, QuickBird, IKONOS, ASTER and LANDSAT 7 +ETM have benefited geologists, scientists and exploration managers in earth sciences due to the advantage of large scale mapping and the sensors containing multiple band colors which allows them to interpret wavelengths that cannot be seen by the human eye, such as near infrared, short wave infrared and thermal infrared to identify the difference in structural features of the earth’s surface.

ikonos satellite image nevada-mining

IKONOS Satellite Image of Mining Operations in Nevada

Multispectral imaging and thematic mapping allows researchers to collect data of reflection and absorption properties of soils, rock, and vegetation. This data could be utilized to interpret actual surface lithology to identify clays, oxides and soils from satellite images.

The use of satellite imagery in mineral exploration, generally a combination of panchromatic and multispectral image data has been used in mineral and petroleum industries over the last decade. With higher resolution satellite sensors increasing over the last decade such as GeoEye-1 (0.41m) and WorldView-2 (0.46m) both providing panchromatic and multispectral full color imagery that is used to utilize enhanced spectral analysis for mapping, monitoring and analyzing landcover classification and extraction of culture data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) classification and mapping, lithological classification, change detection, environmental monitoringdevelopment, land-use planning, visualization and simulation environments such as digital elevation models (DEMs) and 3d terrain modeling.

aster satellite image mining escondida chile

ASTER (15m) Satellite Images of Escondida open-pit mine in Atacama Desert, Chile

aster satellite image mining escondida chile

This ASTER image covers 30 by 37 km in the Atacama Desert, Chile and was acquired on April 23, 2000. The Escondida Cu-Au-Ag open-pit mine is at an elevation of 3050 m, and came on stream in 1990. Escondida is related geologically to three porphyry bodies intruded along the Chilean West Fissure Fault System. A high grade supergene cap overlies primary sulfide ore. The top image is a conventional 3-2-1 RGB composite. The bottom image displays SWIR bands 4-6-8 in RGB, and highlights lithologic and alteration differences of surface units. Imagery Credit: NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

Geologists and Geoscientists have used satellite images to serve as databases from which they can do the following:

  • Pick out rock units (stratigraphy)
  • Study the expression and modes of the origin of landforms (geomorphology)
  • Determine the structural arrangements of disturbed strata (folds and faults)
  • Evaluate dynamic changes from natural events (e.g., floods; volcanic eruptions)
  • Seek surface clues (such as alteration and other signs of mineralization) to subsurface deposits of ore minerals, oil and gas, and groundwater.
  • Function as a visual base on which a geologic map is drawn either directly or on a transparent overlay.

digital elevation model argyle_view_diamond_mine_3d

ASTER Satellite Image of Argyle Diamond Mine, Australia- DEM

A well collated and structured data base integrated into a powerful GIS project can be used to collect and create valuable data for the planning and exploration program for:

  1. The advantage of creating large scale area maps which allows them to examine in single scenes or in mosaics the geological portrayal of Earth on a regional basis.
  2. The ability to analyze multispectral bands quantitatively in terms of numbers permits them to apply special image processing techniques to discern and enhance certain compositional properties of Earth materials.
  3. The capability of merging different types of remote sensing products (e.g., reflectance images with radar or with thermal imagery) or combining these with topographic elevation data (DEMs) and with other kinds of information bases (e.g., thematic maps; geophysical measurements and chemical sampling surveys) enables views of existing or planning of proposed mines.
  4. Mapping subregional surface geology.
  5. Creating field exploration maps with detailed views of access roads.

Remote sensed data and GIS for mineral exploration is a key to management, planning and monitoring programs requiring on accurate information about the land cover in a region. Methods for monitoring vegetation and land change range from intensive field sampling with plot inventories to extensive analysis of remotely sensed data which has proven to be more cost effective for large regions, small site assessment and analysis.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation;

Satellite Imaging Corporation provides high resolution satellite imagery from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, WorldView-2 Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5 and other remote sensing products for analysis and mapping applications such as Geographic Information System (GIS).

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite image processing techniques and produce seamless orthorectified satellite imaging mosaic DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS applications including, flight simulations and terrain modeling for your specific project needs.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910

Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Images and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) Help Monitor Global Warming and Climate Change

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

The Earth, our home in space, is a varied and dynamic place. Since the beginning of human history we have sought a better understanding of the world around us. With the new technology of the aerospace age and satellite image technology, we can look back and appreciate the diversity and the beauty of the Earth in a way not possible until the 20th century.

geoeye-1 satellite

Geoeye-1 Satellite Sensor – Panchromatic and Multispectral Imaging

Copyright GeoEye

Since 1990′s a new generation of satellite sensors with powerful capabilities have been launched to collect massive amounts of data about our planet and the many changes it has experienced.

There are dozens of remote sensing satellites orbiting the Earth collecting invaluable information about the Earth’s surface, oceans and the atmosphere and how they interact. Satellite images have been collected for scientific and technical purposes as well as just appreciating its simple beauty. These satellites collect information that our eyes cannot, collections from 30M to 0.5M resolution is now available.

Satellite images provide important land coverage information for mapping and classification of land cover features, such as vegetation, soil, water and forests for monitoring and managing Earth’s vital natural resources and the current global climate changes.

satellite image typhoon morakot Taiwan

Typhoon Morakot, Tawain – QuickBird Satellite Image (0.61m)

Copyright DigitalGlobe

The Earth’s climate has changed throughout history. From glacial periods (or “ice ages”) where ice covered significant portions of the Earth to interglacial periods where ice retreated to the poles or melted entirely – the climate and the Earth has continuously changed.

The shallow end of the Glaciers are melting swiftly. Glaciologists have determined that areas of the glacial lobe were 98 feet lower in 2004 than they were in 2000. That’s double the rate of pre-1999 thinning.

landsat satellite image

Landsat Satellite Image of Antarctica

The current warming trend is of particular significance because most of it is very likely human-induced and proceeding at a rate that is unprecedented in the past 1,300 years.

Scientists have been able to piece together a picture of the Earth’s climate dating back decades to millions of years ago by analyzing a number of surrogate, or “proxy,” measures of climate such as ice cores, boreholes, tree rings, glacier lengths, pollen remains, and ocean sediments, and by studying changes in the Earth’s orbit around the sun.

To view a Tour of Our Cryosphere (Glacial Melting) go here.

Deforestation in Bolivia, SA from 1975 to 2000

San Bernadino, CA Wildfires

Deforestation of Rondonia, Brazil from 1975 to 2009

Five-Year Average Global Temperature Anomalies for 1888,1918,1948,1978, 2008

Earth-orbiting satellites and other technological advances have enabled scientists to see the big picture, collecting many different types of information about our planet and its climate on a global scale. Studying this data collected over many years reveal the signals of a changing climate.

Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere will increase during the next century unless greenhouse gas emissions decrease substantially from present levels. Increased greenhouse gas concentrations are very likely to raise the Earth’s average temperature, influence precipitation and increase in storm patterns as well as raise sea levels. The magnitude of these changes, however, is uncertain.

Digital Elevation Models

Satellite images allow scientists to remove vegetation, water and geological cover from the image data which allows them to produce the most detailed available Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of landscape topography. The creation of DEMs will revolutionize geological applications, land-use studies, soil science, and much more to better understand the global climate changes occurring around the world.

eritrea africa dem

Eritrea, Africa – IKONOS Satellite Image over 6m IKONOS Stereo DEM

Digital elevation models provide details about landscape features which in result, will allow us to clearly make out the shape of our landscape and understand how water, ice, and  soil might move across its surface, how it came to be its present shape and how rapidly the changes are occurring.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC) delivers 3D terrain models with posting intervals from 3m to 90m. The high resolution <1m Satellite imaging mosaics and 3m-5m DEMs provide operators with the appropriate planning tools to reduce the risk of environmental impact during operations and improve on safety procedures. SIC provides a large amount of satellite remote sensing data at different spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions from sensors such as GeoEye-1, Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5, LANDSAT and ASTER, by using the appropriate combination of bands to bring out the geographical and manmade features that are most pertinent to your project for detecting and monitoring changes.

Satellite Imaging Corporation combines orthorectified satellite images and digital aerial photography mosaics with extracted vector and client-supplied attribute data to create single, data-rich images for GIS and other mapping applications to achieve a multi-layered result for many types of analysis.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Images and GIS Aid in Disease Mapping and Surveillance

Wednesday, October 7th, 2009

Satellite images and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can provide public health officials with vital information needed to detect and manage certain disease outbreaks. In order to properly plan, manage and monitor any public health system, it is very important to have up to date, relevant information available to decision-makers at all levels throughout all regions of the world.

H1N1 Swine Flu Mapping

Satellite Imagery and GIS Epidemiology Mapping for Swine Flu

Image Credit FluTracker

Also known as Landscape Epidemiology, which involves the identification of geographical areas where disease is transmitted. By knowing the vegetation and geologic conditions necessary for the maintenance of specific pathogens in nature, one can use the landscape to identify the spatial and temporal distribution of disease risk. Key environmental elements, including elevation, temperature, rainfall, and humidity, influence the presence, development, activity, and longevity of pathogens, vectors, zoonotic reservoirs of infection, and their interactions with humans.

Vegetation type and distribution are also influenced by the environmental variables mentioned above, and can be expressed as landscape elements that can be sensed remotely and whose relationships can be modeled spatially. For the past 29 years, satellite sensors have proved to be valuable tools for describing the earth’s landscape. Since the launch of Landsat 7 and ASTER, NASA has initiated programs to integrate these technologies into the areas of forestry, agriculture, geology,  and public health.

vegetation land cover

Landsat Satellite Image – Vegetation Cover

aster hydrology

ASTER Satellite Image – Hydrology

Satellite images can greatly enhance a GIS mapping project. Imagery is a powerful visual aid and serves as a source of derivative information such as planimetrics and classification schemes to derive such information as land cover and change detection or vegetation classification.

The use of GIS has many implications for landscape epidemiology because it provides users the ability to store, integrate, query, display, and analyze data from the molecular level to that of satellite resolution through their shared spatial components. Field observations and vector data retrieved on environmental conditions, including vegetation, water (hydrology), and topography, can be combined in a GIS mapping environment to direct interpretation of remote sensed data and facilitate characterization of the landscape in terms of vector and pathogen prevalence.

geospatial gis

GIS Epidemiology

Example of GIS Epidemiology for Malaria

Image Credit World Health Organization (WHO)

The associations between disease risk variables (e.g., vector, pathogen, and reservoir host abundance and distribution) and environmental variables can be quantified using the spatial analysis capabilities of the GIS. Landscape pattern analysis, combined with statistical analysis, allows us to define landscape predictors of disease risk that can be applied in larger regions where field data are unavailable. This makes remote sensing and GIS a powerful set of tools for disease surveillance, predicting potential disease outbreaks, and targeting intervention programs.

The analysis and mapping of data using GIS include:

  • The spread of diseases over time
  • Spatial patterns of outbreaks
  • Population groups at risk
  • Availability and access to health care
  • Program intervention planning and assessment

Examples of Interactive Disease Maps

Health Map on Virus Alerts

2009  Swine Flu Outbreak Map

Satellite Imaging Corporation

Satellite Imaging Corporation combines orthorectified satellite images and digital aerial photography mosaics with extracted vector and client-supplied attribute data to create single, data-rich images for GIS and other mapping applications to achieve a multi-layered result for many types of analysis.

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using GIS applications including, flight simulations, terrain modeling, engineering and construction using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data from satellite sensors such as GeoEye-1, Worldview-1, QuickBird, IKONOS, Landsat 7 and ASTER.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: www.satimagingcorp.com

CRYOSAT Satellite Sensor Scheduled to Launch in 2010

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

ESA’s CryoSat satellite is scheduled to launch February 2010. CryoSat will acquire accurate measurements of the thickness of floating sea-ice so that seasonal to inter-annual variations can be detected. Its primary objective is to test the prediction that Arctic sea ice is thinning due to global warming.

Cryosat

ESA’s CryoSat-2

Image Credit: ESA

The question of whether global climate change is causing the polar ice caps to shrink is one of the most hotly debated environmental issues we currently face. ESA’s Earth Observation Program main aim is to improve our understanding of how the Earth system works and the effect that human activity is having on natural Earth processes.

The CryoSat satellite will carry the first all-weather microwave radar altimeter optimized for detecting changes in the elevation of both types of ice. The core instrument is called SIRAL, short for SAR Interferometric Radar Altimeter it has two radar antennas and exploits synthetic aperture processing.

CryoSat will also survey the surface of continental ice sheets to detect small elevation changes. CryoSat’s high spatial resolution radar altimeter is capable of operating in a number of modes, optimized for measurement over different surfaces.

For some years, satellites such as Envisat, ASTER and Landsat 7 +ETM have been mapping the extent of ice cover. However, in order to understand how climate change is affecting these sensitive regions, there is an urgent need to determine how the thickness of the ice is changing.

Watch Video: Short Tour of the Cryosphere

The altimeter makes a measurement of the distance between the satellite and the surface of the Earth. This measurement can not be converted into the more useful measurement of height of the surface until the position of the satellite is accurately known. This requires that CryoSat-2 carry some specific equipment.

CryoSat Technical Overview

Satellite image data contributes to a wide array of global change-related application areas for vegetation and ecosystem dynamics, environmental monitoring, land surface climatology, hydrology, land cover change, and the generation of orthorectified Digital Elevation Models (DEM’s).

Landsat Satellite Image of Antarctica

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), a privately held technology company, provides global satellite imaging and processing services for a number of industries, including oil and gas, mining, cadastre, tax mapping, construction, environmental, forestry and agriculture.

The company specializes in mono and stereo satellite imaging technology producing seamless orthorectified Satellite Imaging mosaics DEM’s and 3D terrain models for many industries using CAD and GIS applications including, flight simulations, terrain modeling, engineering and construction using high and medium resolution mono and stereo satellite image data.

For more information contact:

Satellite Imaging Corporation
12777 Jones Road, Suite 370
Houston, Texas 77070-4671
U.S.A.

Toll Free (866) 283-2952 (US and Canada only)
Tel: (1) 832-237-2900
Fax: (1) 832-237-2910
Website: http://www.satimagingcorp.com

Satellite Imaging Corporation using GeoEye-1 Satellite Sensor to acquire Stereo Imagery at 0.5m Resolution for Production of 2m Digital Elevation Models (DEMs)

Monday, March 9th, 2009

With the successful launch of GeoEye-1 satellite sensor from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on September 6, 2008 at 11:50:57 Hrs (PST), successful completion of testing and calibration GeoEye released the satellite for commercial orders on February 5, 2009.

Since February 5, 2009, Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC) received orders from various customers to acquire new GeoEye-1 mono and stereo satellite imagery with image resolution of 0.5 meter supporting county tax mapping, engineering/ construction, mining, land development and natural resources management.

Satellite imagery is used for many GIS and CAD applications requiring detailed up-to-date image data for planning purposes and change detection. For three-dimensional (3D) applications, Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), and contours can be delivered through high cost aircraft based LiDAR surveys. But with constricted budgets, elevation data is sometimes obtained from old and unreliable data sources with 10 meter or 30 meter postings. For international project planning, many exploration and engineering companies are limited to 30m ASTER DEM data sets or Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 90 meter DEM data to have access to digital terrain models. When local topographic maps are available at a suitable scale, elevation contours are sometimes extracted from the topographic maps.

0_ikonos3mdsm1

3 Meter IKONOS DSM – Pipeline Corridor

The GeoEye-1 and IKONOS satellite sensors provide the best solution for organizations and companies requiring cost-effective high-resolution image data and Digital Terrain Models (DTMs).

“With the increased geo-location position accuracy of the GeoEye-1 satellite sensor the number of required GPS derived Ground Control Points (GCP’s) can be drastically reduced, thereby reducing operational cost and security risks in foreign countries, making the GeoEye-1 satellite sensor a platform of choice to acquire 0.5 meter high-resolution imagery and DEM products.” said Leopold Romeijn, President of Satellite Imaging Corporation.

Covering large areas a horizontal position accuracy of <1 meter can be obtained with just one or two GCP’s, and without any GCP’s, geo-location accuracies of <5 meter can be achieved depending on terrain conditions and collection geometry during the time of image data collection.

GIS and CAD professionals are now able to work with satellite imagery at 0.5 meter resolution, 2 meter digital raster DEMs, 1 meter elevation contours and TIN models, thereby facilitating a 3D computer work environments, supporting the planning and construction of roads, facilities, pipelines and many other project applications.

Golf Resort in Egypt Commissioned Satellite Imaging Corporation to Acquire QuickBird Satellite Image for Design and Construction

Sunday, October 26th, 2008

The Ancient Sands Golf Resort in El Gouna, Egypt commissioned Satellite Imaging Corporation to acquire a new QuickBird Satellite Image, at a resolution of 0.6m, for the El Gouna resort in Egypt, supporting the design and monitor construction of the new Ancient Sands Golf Resort.

Satellite Imaging Corporation (SIC), under contract with Ancient Sands Golf Resort in El Gouna, Egypt, acquired a new QuickBird Satellite Image with a resolution of 0.6m. On August 22, 2008 at 08:47:16.6 GMT, the QuickBird Satellite sensor collected the near nadir Satellite Image.

QuickBird Satellite Image for Design and Construction

Golf Resort in Egypt

This majestic resort is rising out of the desert sands to create an oasis of luxury. Ancient Sands Resort will combine the best of Egyptian tradition with western style comfort and exacting standards. This luxury, gated development is in the world famous resort town of El Gouna, the Red Sea’s Premier Leisure Destination including world hotels and resorts from Sheraton, Moevenpick, Steigenberger and Club Med. Luxury properties are set amongst an 18-hole Karl Litten designed championship golf course overlooking an azure lagoon which flows into the development from the sea.

The QuickBird satellite image, with a pixel resolution of 0.6m, provides an up-to-date view of the construction efforts and allows project management and designers to maximize the area available for the resort. Current satellite remote sensing technology provides a modern tool to evaluate progress on large scale construction projects, such as the Palm Islands development projects helping engineering companies organize, plan and monitor Dubai’s number one tourist destination. The three large man-made resort islands (Jumeirah, Jebel Ali and Deira) are built on the shorelines of Dubai, UAE.

“Today’s high-resolution satellite remote sensing technology with 0.5m resolution capabilities can provide construction project managers with up-to-date project information on the progress of large construction projects around the world,” said Leopold J. Romeijn, President of Satellite Imaging Corporation in Houston, Texas.

About Satellite Imaging Corporation:

Satellite Imaging Corporation provides new and archived high and medium resolution satellite imagery and satellite maps in support of many industry applications using commercial satellites including, IKONOS, GeoEye-1, QuickBird, ASTER, ALOS, SPOT-5 and others sensors.

Virunga National Park Gorilla Murders – Caught in the Line of Fire – Satellite Imaging Update

Friday, July 4th, 2008

On July 2007, four rare mountain gorillas from the Rugendo Family were senselessly shot execution style in the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC) Virunga National Parks. An estimated 700 of these primates remain in the wild, and this is one of the worst massacres of mountain gorillas since scientist Dian Fossey began battling poachers 40 years ago in the very same region. The question remains who killed these magnificent creatures and most of all why?

Kuryama the Mountain Gorilla

Orphan – “Nedeze”

Orphan – “Ndakasi”

Photo Credit: Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund

Virunga National Park established in 1925 is Africa’s First National Park, bordered by Uganda and Rwanda contains 790,000 hectares of the greatest diversity of habitats that range from glaciers at 16,000 ft to lowland forest at 1,800 ft, and include savannas, wetlands, bamboo, montane forest, and active volcanoes. It harbors more bird (706) and mammal (196) species than any other Park in Africa, and contains 109 reptiles, 78 amphibians, at least 2,077 plant species. From steppes, savannas and lava plains, swamps, lowland and forests to volcanoes, thousands of hippopotamuses and elephants live in the park’s rivers and its mountains are a critical area for the survival of the endangered mountain and lowland gorillas.

Landsat 5 Satellite Image IKONOS Satellite Image of Visoke

Virunga National Parks Volcano 3D Terrain Model

Virunga National Parks and its endangered mountain gorillas have been caught in a deadly crossfire for years between militia groups and the Congolese Army. It is a bloody conflict complicated by the pressures of a surging refugee population and an illegal $30 million charcoal trade decimating the park and threatening the gorillas’ lives.

On Tuesday, July 1st and 5th, 2008, National Geographic Channel’s “Explorer: Gorilla Murders” reports from eastern DRC, with the full untold story behind the massacre. National Geographic journalists will be the first Westerners to gain access to the gorilla sector of the park since the killings occurred. National Geographic presents exclusive testimonials from eyewitnesses, who discuss the hunt to bring the perpetrators to justice and the desperate efforts to protect the remaining gorillas, including a lucky little infant who was found still clinging to its mother.

For more information on this special episode visit National Geographic.

“Explorer: Gorilla Murders” is produced by National Geographic Television and Film. Executive producer is Jonathan Halperin, senior producer is Robert Zakin and producer/director is Michael Davie. For National Geographic Channel, executive producer is Kathleen Cromley; senior vice president of production is Juliet Blake; and executive vice president of content is Steve Burns.

To view our story on “How Conservationist and Scientists Use Satellite Image Technology to Monitor the Mountain Gorillas in Virunga National Parks go here.

More on the massacred Rugendo Gorilla Family.

To read Dian Fossey’s Articles in National Geographic

Wildlife Direct – read the latest up to minute news about the mountain gorillas, cheetahs, rhinos, bonobos, and other large African wildlife.

About Us

Satellite Imaging Corporation provides satellite imagery and GIS mapping in support of conservation for groups such as Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International and provides imagery with valuable information on land cover and use changes for wildlife protected areas utilizing satellite sensors such as QuickBird, IKONOS, SPOT-5, LANDSAT, ASTER, ALOS and Aerial Photography for assessment and monitoring of our forests.

Satellite images provide extremely useful information to Conservationists, Scientists and Researchers in viewing out-of-the-way remote places. Conservationists, for example, must monitor far-flung areas in need of protection. Wars, poverty, remoteness, lack of government involvement, and uncertainty over the best places and ways to focus limited resources can all hinder conservation efforts. Now, satellite imagery is giving scientists and conservationists some of the tools they need to get valuable information on land cover and land use changes in wild areas that are in need of protection.

Landsat Satellite Image Mosaic Reveals Antarctic

Tuesday, January 29th, 2008

More than a thousand scenes captured during seven years of satellite observations have created the visually stunning true-color Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) by NASA, USGS, National Science Foundation (NSF) and British Antarctic Survey (BAS). The virtually cloudless satellite view of Antarctica’s frozen landscape provides much greater detail for the entire continent than ever before.

Read the Latest Story on the Discovery of Sub-Glacial Volcanic Eruption in Antarctica – January 20, 2008

To View Images in Full Resolution Click on Images

Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica

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The mosaic is made up of about 1,100 satellite images from Landsat 7, nearly all of which were captured between 1999 and 2001.

Landsat Image - Pourquoi Pas Island, Antarctic Peninsula

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Advances in satellite technology since the 1970′s have revolutionized scientific study of the Earth’s greatest natural laboratory. For example, movement of glaciers, previously measured by ground-based measurements or aerial photography, is now much better understood as a result of upgraded instruments on each new Earth-observing satellite. This will help society and world leaders make informed decisions and come up with strategies to cope with global change. The mosaic is made up of about 1,100 images from Landsat 7, nearly all of which were captured between 1999 and 2001. The collage of images contains virtually no gaps in the landscape, other than a doughnut hole-shaped area at the South Pole because the orbital limits of Landsat means that anywhere south of 83degrees cannot be imaged. LIMA shows virtually no seams between images. Each pixel’s color represents the true reflectance of light off the surface, a quality useful to scientists.

Resources:

British Antarctic Survey

For educational materials related to the new Antarctic mosaic on the web, visit:
http://lima.nasa.gov